Beautiful Quotes By Friedrich August von Hayek

Friedrich Hayek Quotes

“Liberty and responsibility are inseparable.”




“If socialists understood economics, they wouldn’t be socialist.”




“The idea of social justice is that the state should treat different people unequally in order to make them equal.”




“You can have economic freedom without political freedom, but you cannot have political freedom without economic freedom.”




“A society that does not recognise that each individual has values of his own which he is entitled to follow can have no respect for the dignity of the individual and cannot really know freedom.”




“The curious task of economics is to demonstrate to men how little they really know about what they imagine they can design.”




“Social justice rests on the hate towards those that enjoy a comfortable position, namely, upon envy.”




“In government, the scum rises to the top.”




“To be controlled in our economic pursuits means to be controlled in everything.”




“Conservatism is only as good as what it conserves.”




“And who will deny that a world in which the wealthy are powerful is still a better world than one in which only the already powerful can acquire wealth?”




“A claim for equality of material position can be met only by a government with totalitarian powers.”




“Through the inevitable mismanagement of resources and goods at the disposal of the state, all forms of collectivism lead eventually to tyranny.”




“There is all the difference in the world between treating people equally and attempting to make them equal.”




“Any man who is only an economist is unlikely to be a good one.”




“Human reason can neither predict nor deliberately shape its own future. Its advances consist in finding out where it has been wrong.”




“Freedom granted only when it is known beforehand that its effects will be beneficial is not freedom.”




“The more the state “plans” the more difficult planning becomes for the individual.”




“Socialism has never and nowhere been at first a working-class movement.”




“It seems to be almost a law of human nature that it is easier for people to agree on a negative program – on the hatred of an enemy, on the envy of those better off – than on any positive task.”




“Fascism is the stage reached after communism has proved an illusion.”




“When it becomes dominated by a collectivist creed, democracy will inevitably destroy itself.”




“The history of government management of money has, except for a few short happy periods, been one of incessant fraud and deception.”




“Nothing distinguishes more clearly conditions in a free country from those in a country under arbitrary government than the observance in the former of the great principles known as the Rule of Law.”




“By giving the government unlimited powers, the most arbitrary rule can be made legal; and in this way a democracy may set up the most complete despotism imaginable.”




“To combat the depression by a forced credit expansion is to attempt to cure the evil by the very means which brought it about.”




“Should our moral beliefs really prove to be dependent on factual assumptions shown to be incorrect, it would be hardly moral to defend them by refusing to acknowledge the facts.”




“It is of the essence of the demand for equality before the law that people should be treated alike in spite of the fact that they are different.”




“If freedom is to flourish the philosophic foundations of a free society must be kept a living intellectual issue and its implementation a task which challenges the ingenuity and imagination of the liveliest minds.”




“It is possible for a dictator to govern in a liberal way. And it is also possible for a democracy to govern with a total lack of liberalism. Personally I prefer a liberal dictator to democratic government lacking liberalism.”




“Even the striving for equality by means of a directed economy can result only in an officially enforced inequality – an authoritarian determination of the status of each individual in the new hierarchical order.”




“The chief evil is unlimited government, and nobody is qualified to wield unlimited power.”




“Planning leads to dictatorship because dictatorship is the most effective instrument of coercion and the enforcement of ideals and, as such, essential if central planning on a large scale is to be possible.”




“Once you admit that the individual is merely a means to serve the ends of the higher entity called society or the nation, most of those features of totalitarianism which horrify us follow of necessity.”




“The system of private property is the most important guaranty of freedom, not only for those who own property, but scarcely less for those who do not.”




“There is, in a competitive society, nobody who can exercise even a fraction of the power which a socialist planning board would possess.”




“The mischievous idea that all public needs should be satisfied by compulsory organization and that all the means that individuals are willing to devote to pubic purposes should be under the control of government, is wholly alien to the basic principles of a free society.”




“This is the constitutional limitation of man’s knowledge and interests, the fact that he cannot know more than a tiny part of the whole of society and that therefore all that can enter into his motives are the immediate effects which his actions will have in the sphere he knows.”




“The principle that the end justifies the means is in individualist ethics regarded as the denial of all morals. In collectivist ethics it becomes necessarily the supreme rule.”




“Freedom can be preserved only if it is treated as a supreme principle which must not be sacrificed for particular advantages.”




“I was quite depressed two weeks ago when I spent an afternoon at Brentano’s Bookshop in New York and was looking at the kind of books most people read. Once you see that you lose all hope.”




“Least of all shall we preserve democracy or foster its growth if all the power and most of the important decisions rest with an organization far too big for the common man to survey or comprehend.”




“Competition is like experimentation in science, a discovery process, and it must rely on the self interest of producers, it must allow them to use their knowledge for their purposes, because nobody else possesses the information.”




“Once politics become a tug-of-war for shares in the income pie, decent government is impossible.”




“We must raise and train an army of fighters for freedom.”




“Personally I prefer a liberal dictator to democratic government lacking liberalism.”




“Without a theory the facts are silent.”




“Money is one of the greatest instruments of freedom ever invented by man. It is money which in existing society opens an astounding range of choice to the poor man, a range greater than that which not many generations ago was open to the wealthy.”




“Capitalism created the possibility of employment.”




“The idea that human kind can shape the world according to wish is what I call the fatal conceit.”




“It is no accident that on the whole there was more beauty and decency to be found in the life of the small peoples, and that among the large ones there was more happiness and content in proportion as they had avoided the deadly blight of centralization.”




“The mind cannot foresee its own advance.”




“To create conditions in which competition will be as effective as possible, to prevent fraud and deception, to break up monopolies- these tasks provide a wide and unquestioned field for state activity.”




“If we can reduce the risk of friction likely to lead to war, this is probably all we can reasonably hope to achieve.”




“Nobody with open eyes can any longer doubt that the danger to personal freedom comes chiefly from the left.”




“I must confess that if I had been consulted whether to establish a Nobel Prize in economics, I should have decidedly advised against it.”




“Nowhere has democracy ever worked well without a great measure of local self-government, providing a school of political training for the people at large as much as for their future leaders.”




“I regard it in fact as the great advantage of the mathematical technique that it allows us to describe, by means of algebraic equations, the general character of a pattern even where we are ignorant of the numerical values which will determine its particular manifestation.”




“It is rather a problem of how to secure the best use of resources known to any of the members of society, for ends whose relative importance only those individuals know.”




“We know, in other words, the general conditions in which what we call, somewhat misleadingly, an equilibrium will establish itself: but we never know what the particular prices or wages are which would exist if the market were to bring about such an equilibrium.”




“Wherever liberty as we understand it has been destroyed, this has almost always been done in the name of some new freedom promised to the people.”




“As is true with respect to other great evils, the measures by which war might be made altogether impossible for the future may well be worse than even war itself.”




“If I am not mistaken, psychology, psychiatry and some branches of sociology, not to speak about the so-called philosophy of history, are even more affected by what I have called the scientistic prejudice, and by specious claims of what science can achieve.”




“Never will man penetrate deeper into error than when he is continuing on a road which has led him to great success.”




“It would clearly not be an improvement to build all houses exactly alike in order to create a perfect market for houses, and the same is true of most other fields where differences between the individual products prevent competition from ever being perfect.”




“The greatest danger to liberty today comes from the men who are most needed and most powerful in modern government, namely, the efficient expert administrators exclusively concerned with what they regard as the public good.”




“We shall all be the gainers if we can create a world fit for small states to live in.”




“Our moral traditions developed concurrently with our reason, not as its product.”




“It is neither necessary nor desirable that national boundaries should mark sharp differences in standards of living, that membership of a national group should entitle to a share in a cake altogether different from that in which members of other groups share.”




“Socialism is simply a re-assertion of that tribal ethics whose gradual weakening had made an approach to the Great Society possible.”




“Hayek was making us think of the productive process as a process in time, inputs coming before outputs.”




“The credit which the apparent conformity with recognized scientific standards can gain for seemingly simple but false theories may, as the present instance shows, have grave consequences.”




“Without the rich – without those who accumulated capital – those poor who could exist at all would be very much poorer indeed, scratching a livelihood from marginal lands on which every drought would kill most of the children they would be trying to raise.”




“That there is little hope of international order or lasting peace so long as every country is free to employ whatever measures it thinks desirable in its own immediate interest, however damaging they may be to others, needs little emphasis now.”




“We know: of course, with regard to the market and similar social structures, a great many facts which we cannot measure and on which indeed we have only some very imprecise and general information.”




“We shall not grow wiser before we learn that much that we have done was very foolish.”




“We did not realise how fragile our civilisation was.”




“Economic transactions between national bodies who are at the same time the supreme judges of their own behavior, who bow to no superior law, and whose representatives cannot be bound by any considerations but the immediate interest of their respective nations, must end in clashes of power.”




“Perhaps even more than elsewhere current notions of what is desirable and practicable are here still of a kind which may well produce the opposite of what they promise.”




“We must make the building of a free society once more an intellectual adventure, a deed of courage.”




“We must shed the illusion that we can deliberately “create the future of mankind.” This is the final conclusion of the forty years which I have now devoted to the study of these problems.”




“The progress of the natural sciences in modern times has of course so much exceeded all expectations that any suggestion that there may be some limits to it is bound to arouse suspicion.”




“We can either have a free Parliament or a free people. Personal freedom requires that all authority is restrained by long-run principles which the opinion of the people approves.”




“It seems to me that socialists today can preserve their position in academic economics merely by the pretense that the differences are entirely moral questions about which science cannot decide.”




“What a free society offers to the individual is much more than what he would be able to do if only he were free.”




“Socialism has never and nowhere been at first a working-class movement. It is by no means an obvious remedy for the obvious evil which the interests of that class will necessarily demand. It is a construction of theorists.”




“We must face the fact that the preservation of individual freedom is incompatible with a full satisfaction of our views of distributive justice.”




“Whenever it is necessary that one of several conflicting opinions should prevail and when one would have to be made to prevail by force if need be, it is less wasteful to determine which has the stronger support by counting numbers than by fighting.”




“Is there a greater tragedy imaginable than that, in our endeavour consciously to shape our future in accordance with high ideals, we should in fact unwittingly produce the very opposite of what we have been striving for?”




“Unlike the position that exists in the physical sciences, in economics and other disciplines that deal with essentially complex phenomena, the aspects of the events to be accounted for about which we can get quantitative data are necessarily limited and may not include the important ones.”




“With the exception only of the period of the gold standard, practically all governments of history have used their exclusive power to issue money to defraud and plunder the people.”




“In no other field has the world yet paid so dearly for the abandonment of nineteenth-century liberalism as in the field where the retreat began: in international relations. Yet only a small part of the lesson which experience ought to have taught us has been learned.”




“He will therefore have to use what knowledge he can achieve, not to shape the results as the craftsman shapes his handiwork, but rather to cultivate a growth by providing the appropriate environment, in the manner in which the gardener does this for his plants.”




“Justice, like liberty and coercion, is a concept which, for the sake of clarity, ought to be confined to the deliberate treatment of men by other men.”




“Why should we, however, in economics, have to plead ignorance of the sort of facts on which, in the case of a physical theory, a scientist would certainly be expected to give precise information?”




“Once wide coercive powers are given to governmental agencies for particular purposes, such powers cannot be effectively controlled by democratic assemblies.”




“If most people are not willing to see the difficulty, this is mainly because, consciously or unconsciously, they assume that it will be they who will settle these questions for the others, and because they are convinced of their own capacity to do this.”




“It used to be the boast of free men that, so long as they kept within the bounds of the known law, there was no need to ask anybody’s permission or to obey anybody’s orders. It is doubtful whether any of us can make this claim today.”




“Many of the greatest things man has achieved are not the result of consciously directed thought, and still less the product of a deliberately coordinated effort of many individuals, but of a process in which the individual plays a part which he can never fully understand.”




“This is not a dispute about whether planning is to be done or not. It is a dispute as to whether planning is to be done centrally, by one authority for the whole economic system, or is to be divided among many individuals.”

Here on this site, you can read all types of quotes In English I hope you like “Quotes By Friedrich August von Hayek” and share it with your friends. You may read Funny QuotesOscar Wilde Quotes, and Inspirational Quotes For Teachers. You can subscribe to our website to get updates about new Quotes.

 I would like to hear your opinion, so make sure you leave a comment on the post. See you in the next post with something super useful. :) Ta-Ta!


Beautiful Quotes By Friedrich August von Hayek Beautiful Quotes By Friedrich August von Hayek Reviewed by Silent Tears on March 01, 2021 Rating: 5

No comments:

Share Your Feeling & Favorite Quotes In Comments

Powered by Blogger.